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Monday, October 22, 2012

A BILLBOAR WARNING THAT VOTER FRAUD IS A FELONY IS DEEMED INTIMIDATING, DISCRIMINATING, AND MUST BE REMOVED

OHIO - ARE YOU THIS CONFUSED THAT YOU CAN'T SEE WHAT IS HAPPENING?

THIS IS THE RACE CARD.  DEMONS (OR DEMONRATS) COME IN ALL COLORS.  THEY SOMETIMES HAVE SCALES.  OR FUR.  OR ARMANI SUITS WHICH AREN'T KNOCKOFFS, WHILE YOU WEAR IMITATION DESIGNER HOODIES.  COME ON!  WHERE ARE YOUR DREAMS?  HAVE YOU GIVEN THEM UP TO GET A FLOGGIN' OBAMAPHONE?  YOU ARE SELLING YOUR SOULS AND BEING USED.  DO YOU THINK OBAMACARE WILL BE FIRST CLASS HEALTH CARE? 

WHEN WE RUN OUT OF MONEY, AND MONEY HAS NO VALUE, AND YOUR EDT CARDS BUY LESS, AND YOUR HOUSING CAN'T BE FUNDED ANYMORE UNDER OBAMA YOUR SAVIOR, YOU'RE GOING TO BE HUDDLED AROUND A FIRE MADE FROM YOUR POOR QUALITY FURNITURE IN THE YARD WHEN IT'S COLD.

WE CAN'T AFFORD THIS AS A NATION.  THINK BEFORE YOU DECIDE TO CAST THAT VOTE.  YOU WILL HAVE NO FUTURE WITH OBAMA. 



http://patriotaction.net/forum/topic/show?id=2600775:Topic:5969700&xgs=1&xg_source=msg_share_topic

The politics of racial pressure being applied...

"
Clear Channel Outdoor will remove 30 billboards across the city that drew complaints of racism and intimidation with their message of "Voter fraud is a felony," the company said Saturday night. The company has said it has a policy against putting anonymous political messages on its billboard and that it erred in agreeing to that contract."

There goes another bit of free speech.....

~ J
H/T TO OUR "MERLIN"

A Billboard Warning that Voter Fraud is a Felony is deemed intimidating, discriminating, and must be removed!

Earlier this month it was Reported by the Plain Dealer in Cleveland Ohio:
An election-related billboard in Cleveland's Ward 5 has caused a stir, prompting some complaints that it discriminates against minority groups and felons.
The advertisement, posted at the intersection of Community College Avenue and East 35th Street, warns that "voting fraud is a felony" in bold lettering. It also states that the penalty is punishable by up to three and a half years in prison and a $10,000 fine.
The ad also shows a gavel and sound block and lists that it was paid for by a private family foundation. The billboard is operated by Clear Channel Outdoor.
VOTERBILLBOARD.JPG
Several politicians said the ad's placement, which is near Tri-C and directly across the street from the Arbor Park 600-family development and other public housing, intimidates minority voters, students and felons who may not know their rights.
Cleveland City Councilwoman Phyllis Cleveland, who publicly complained about the billboard on Tuesday, posted a picture of the advertisement to her Twitter account. She said a resident complained to her about the sign. Cleveland wants it out of her ward.
"Some people in my ward have had issues with the criminal justice system and could feel like they're not able to vote," Cleveland said. "This could be confusing to them."
According to state law, a felon can register to vote after they have served their sentence in prison.
State Sen. Nina Turner, who drove by the billboard on Thursday, likened the advertisement to intimidation tactics used to keep blacks from voting in the times of Jim Crow. Turner said voter fraud is not a problem in the state.
"It does not exist," she said. "For them to target people in the black community is immoral."
Yesterday a follow up article on the story reported:
CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Clear Channel Outdoor will remove 30 billboards across the city that drew complaints of racism and intimidation with their message of "Voter fraud is a felony," the company said Saturday night
The company has said it has a policy against putting anonymous political messages on its billboard and that it erred in agreeing to that contract.
On Saturday, Clear Channel still declined to reveal the name of its client, but said it wanted to correct the error.
"We reviewed the situation, and in light of the fact that these billboards violate our policy of not accepting anonymous political ads, we asked the client how they would prefer to work with us to bring the boards into conformance with our policy," Cullinan said in an email to The Plain Dealer. "The client thought the best solution was to take the boards down, so we are in the process of removing them."
BILLBOARD_13673089.JPG
The new billboards designed to counter the ones that will be removed will be up and visible on Monday.
Opponents had already negotiated with Clear Channel to have the company donate use of 10 billboards that will be visible Monday and carry the message
"Voting Is a Right. Not a Crime!" Cleveland City Council will pay for five more to carry the same message.
The Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under the Law has also paid for about 36 billboards that went up Thursday in Cleveland and Milwaukee in predominantly Latino and black neighborhoods that read, "Stand up and have your say -- Vote. When we vote, we are all equal."
Additional billboards with the same message will be posted next week in Columbus and Cincinnati, the group said.
Cleveland said the decision to remove the billboards is "a great example of free speech in action."  The original billboards were free speech she said, and so was the community's response.
It appears intimidation from the City Council is acceptable. Voter fraud is a felony and signs such as these should be placed around the country, not just in the Cleveland area. It's apparent that Clear Channel Outdoor succumbed to the intimidation and pressured the foundation to remove their signs.
Is voter fraud an issue? USA Today Reports: 
Underestimating our voter fraud vulnerability.
Earlier this year, James O'Keefe released a video of a 22-year-old undercover reporter who obtained Attorney General Eric Holder's ballot in Washington, D.C., and could easily have voted if he had chosen to.
Easy to commit fraud
Chaotic voter registration rolls make it too easy to commit voter fraud. A February study by the non-partisan Pew Center on the States found one in eight voter registrations were inaccurate, out-of-date or duplicates. Nearly 2.8 million people were registered in two or more states, and perhaps 1.8 million registered voters are dead.
Critics of voter ID laws also fail to note they are designed not just to stop voter impersonation but also multiple voting, non-citizen voting, people voting in the wrong precinct, out-of-state voting and voting in the names of fictitious people.
Examples of fraud are plentiful. Three non-citizens were arrested in Iowa last month for voting illegally in the 2010 general election and 2011 city election. A Democratic nominee for Congress resigned in Maryland last month after allegations that she had voted in two states at the same time. A 2004 New York Daily News study found that 46,000 people were registered to vote in both New York City and Florida, and that 400 to 1,000 had voted in both states in the same election. Florida decided the 2000 presidential election by 537 votes.
African-American support
Former congressman Artur Davis says he stopped opposing photo ID laws because of too many instances of voter fraud in his Alabama district, some of which have been prosecuted. "The most aggressive voter suppression in the African-American community ... is the wholesale manufacture of ballots," he says.
A 2012 Rasmussen poll found that 64% of Americans think voter fraud is "very" or "somewhat" serious. Blacks (64%) and those earning under $20,000 a year (71%) agreed.
Voter fraud is a huge issue and needs to be addressed. The current administration including Attorney General, Eric Holder have fought every state that has passed laws cracking down on Voter Fraud by instituting Voter Photo ID.
The Supreme Court has backed that concern. In 2008, it found states have the right to pass photo ID laws; the majority included liberal Justice John Paul Stevens. In a unanimous 2006 decision reinstating Arizona's voter ID law, the court stated: "Voter fraud drives honest citizens out of the democratic process. ... Voters who fear their legitimate votes will be outweighed by fraudulent ones will feel disenfranchised."
We can make it easy to vote and hard to cheat. We should keep trying.

The New York Times:

Supreme Court will decide on Arizona voter ID law

The Supreme Court will weigh in on an anti-fraud provision that was adopted by the state in 2004 but struck down by a federal court.

  • The Supreme Court will weigh in on the controversy over voter fraud when it considers whether Arizona can require people to show proof of citizenship before they can register to vote.
          The Supreme Court will weigh in on the
          controversy over voter fraud when…
          (Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images )
WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court will weigh in on the controversy over voter fraud and decide early next year whether Arizona can require residents to show proof of their citizenship before they register to vote.
The justices agreed to hear Arizona's appeal of an anti-fraud provision that was adopted as a ballot initiative in 2004, but was struck down by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.
Unfortunately, they won't hear the case until next year and that won't be an answer for this election.... But we must keep trying.

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